Coastal Resilience Blog

News and perspectives from the DHS Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence at UNC-Chapel Hill

The Links: June 2017

The Links is a monthly roundup of articles from the Center, good reading and job links that have been posted on our website and social media in the last month.

Website news/blog posts:

CRC in the news:

Good reading:

UPRM coastal conference focuses on infrastructure resilience

Attendees of the March 8-9, 2017, coastal conference at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez. Photo by Dr. Ismael Pagan-Trinidad.

Attendees of the March 8-9, 2017, coastal conference at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez. Photo by Prof. Ismael Pagán-Trinidad.

On March 8-9, 2017, The University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez (UPRM) hosted a conference, “Lessons Learned – Resilience of Coastal Infrastructure.” The meeting was held at the headquarters of the Association of Professional Engineers and Surveyors in Puerto Rico (CIAPR) in San Juan. It was hosted by Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence (CRC) Principal Investigator Prof. Ismael Pagán-Trinidad and co-PI Dr. Ricardo López, who lead the CRC project “Education for Improving Resiliency of Coastal Infrastructure.”

The list of 26 presenters included researchers from the Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research & Development Center (including Lab Director José Sánchez); administrators from the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (DNER); researchers from UPRM Civil Engineering, Marine Sciences, CARICOOS, PR Sea Grant Program, Material Science and Engineering departments; and from CIAPR. More than 100 attendees from government agencies, private organizations, researchers and students participated over the two-day event.

Co-organizers included the Puerto Rico Sea Grant Program, the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Coastal Hydraulic Laboratory, CIAPR, DNER, the Caribbean Coastal Ocean Observing System (CariCOOS) and UPRM.

Highlights included: Continue reading

CRC researcher presents work to Congressional office

Dr. Austin Becker

Dr. Austin Becker

Dr. Austin Becker, a co-PI on a Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence (CRC) project at the University of Rhode Island on a project led by Dr. James Opaluch, presented information on his DHS-funded work to the office of Rep. Alan Lowenthal (D-RI) on June 12, 2017, in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Becker’s presentation, “Coastal infrastructure resilience to extreme events: Geoscience in planning, design and construction,” was part of the Geoscience and the U.S. Economy Briefing Series. The briefing highlighted critical applications of geoscience information in the development and maintenance of necessary infrastructure in the United States.

The presentation describes how geo and ocean science is used to plan for the impacts of severe weather on the maritime transportation system, which accounts for 99 percent of U.S. overseas trade.

In February, Dr. Becker, a professor of marine affairs at the University of Rhode Island, was named a Sloan Research Fellow in Ocean Sciences by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, one of the most prestigious fellowships available to early-career scientists in the United States. The two-year fellowship is awarded to stimulate fundamental research by scholars of outstanding promise in a variety of disciplines.

Dr. Becker’s CRC project with Dr. Opaluch, “Overcoming Barriers to Motivate Community Action to Enhance Resilience,” aims to improve the resiliency of communities by providing better information on the barriers people face to adapting to coastal storm hazards.

Read more about the briefing at the Consortium for Ocean Leadership blog.

The Links: May 2017

The Links is a monthly roundup of articles from the Center, good reading and job links that have been posted on our website and social media in the last month.

Website news/blog posts:

CRC in the news:

Good reading:

U.S. Virgin Islands addresses climate change adaptation challenges

On Feb. 15-16, 2017, Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence (CRC) Director Dr. Gavin Smith was among a group of national experts on climate adaptation and resilience brought to the

Participants at a two-day workshop on preparing for earthquakes, flooding, sea-level rise and other hazards U.S. Virgin Islands was organized by the Governors’ Institute on Community Design and included members of the U.S. Virgin Islands Climate Change Council and other stakeholders. Photo by Dr. Wayne Archibald.

Participants at a two-day workshop on preparing for earthquakes, flooding, sea-level rise and other hazards U.S. Virgin Islands was organized by the Governors’ Institute on Community Design and included members of the U.S. Virgin Islands Climate Change Council and other stakeholders.
Photo by Dr. Wayne Archibald.

U.S. Virgin Islands for a two-day workshop on preparing for earthquakes, flooding, sea-level rise and other hazards. The two-day workshop, which was organized by the Governors’ Institute on Community Design (GICD), included members of the U.S. Virgin Islands Climate Change Council and other stakeholders.

During the workshop, participants heard presentations on how the Virgin Islands could become more resilient to hazards such as hurricanes and associated issues such as erosion and sea-level rise. Participants on the GICD team heard from the Council about the unique issues facing the Virgin Islands and community priorities.

The GICD is a national, nonpartisan program that assists governors in their efforts to support thriving, well-designed urban, suburban and rural communities. It has helped more than 30 state executive teams make choices to enhance communities through use of policy expertise, drawing from leading practitioners in fields such as land use, design, transportation, economic development, natural hazards resilience and regional planning. Continue reading

The Links: April 2017

The Links is a monthly roundup of articles from the Center, good reading and job links that have been posted on our website and social media in the last month.

Website news/blog posts:

CRC in the news:

Good reading:

NC students address recovery in Hurricane Matthew-affected communities during DesignWeek

Kinston DW 2

During DesignWeek in January 2017, students viewed buyout properties in Kinston that flooded during Hurricane Floyd in 1999. Photo by Darien Williams, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

With many communities in the state still in the early stages of recovery from last fall’s Hurricane Matthew, students from North Carolina universities came together to assess the best ways for some of the affected communities to rebuild. In mid-January, the North Carolina State University College of Design held its first DesignWeek, in which students developed designs that could help three eastern North Carolina communities adapt to future flooding events.

About 70 students – from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Department of City and Regional Planning (DCRP), along with those from N.C. State – worked in teams assigned to one of three rural communities: Windsor, Greenville or Kinston. Each school’s faculty, along with industry representatives and community leaders, helped students research and create designs that mitigate flood damage and improve resiliency in the towns.

Several of the students are enrolled in courses that are part of a Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence (CRC) education project at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Open space, greenway connections in Kinston

Darien Williams

Darien Williams

Darien Williams, a first-year graduate student in DCRP at UNC-CH and a Department of Homeland Security Science & Engineering Workforce Development Fellow with the CRC , said his Kinston team approached the challenge of DesignWeek with trepidation.

“None of us are from eastern North Carolina, only a few among us had experience there,” Williams said. “Before envisioning what we could come up with, we dedicated our time to understanding what was needed and being asked for. The first days of DesignWeek were spent simply talking, researching and organizing information: What was Kinston’s demographic makeup? What has been tried there before? What sorts of questions should we ask residents?” Continue reading

The Links: March 2017

The Links is a monthly roundup of articles from the Center, good reading and job links that have been posted on our website and social media in the last month.

Website news:

CRC in the news:

Good reading:

The Links: February 2017

The Links is a monthly roundup of articles from the Center, good reading and job links that have been posted on our website and social media in the last month.

Website news:

CRC in the news:

Good reading:

Continue reading

Second annual meeting focuses on progress of Center’s 22 projects

Medeiros 3

Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence (CRC) researchers, leadership and students – along with federal reviewers and the Center’s Advisory Board – met on Feb. 1-3 for the Center’s second Annual Meeting. Those attending heard updates on the Center’s 22 projects and discussed future Center plans during the 2.5-day meeting.

The CRC’s projects are divided into four central themes – Coastal Infrastructure Resilience; Building Resilient Communities; Disaster Dynamics; and Education and Workforce Development. The 15 research projects and seven education projects are led by researchers across 12 U.S. states and Puerto Rico.

Horney 2

To view our researchers’ presentations, visit their individual pages on our website.

To see photos from the meeting, see our Flickr album. To see some of our researchers describe their projects, see our YouTube playlist.

« Older posts