Coastal Resilience Blog

News and perspectives from the DHS Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence at UNC-Chapel Hill

Category: Uncategorized (page 1 of 4)

CRC students engage with leaders at RISE conference

CRC funded five students to attend the 2019 RISE conference at the University of Albany. From left: Emily Gvino, Alex Halloway, UNC faculty member Dr. Shaleen Miller. Siri Nallaparaju, Keijing Zhou and Sarah Lipuma. Photo submitted.

CRC funded five students to attend the 2019 RISE conference at the University of Albany. From left: Emily Gvino, Alex Halloway, UNC faculty member Dr. Shaleen Miller, Siri Nallaparaju, Kejing Zhou and Sarah Lipuma. Photo submitted.

By Emily Gvino, Kejing Zhou, Siri Nallaparaju, Sarah Lipuma and Alex Halloway

 On Nov. 17-20, 2019, the Coastal Resilience Center sponsored five students from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University to travel to New York for the University at Albany’s 2019 RISE conference. The conference’s theme centered on university engagement in pre- and post-disaster environments, specifically in the context of Hurricane María in Puerto Rico. Students attended panels and plenary talks on preparedness, response, and recovery, while networking with practitioners and researchers.

We were inspired by the words of Cecilio Ortiz Garcia, RISE Co-Chair, who said, “You don’t create resilience – resilience is already there in the community.” We have written our collective insights from this experience below.

Public health preparedness and recovery from natural disasters: Public health’s impact after hurricanes and natural disasters

By Emily Gvino (UNC-CH Master of Public Health and Master of City and Regional Planning Candidate, 2021)

The RISE Conference allowed opportunities to explore the research of various aspects of natural disasters, including public health perspectives. Miguel Cruz, the Senior Emergency Operations Officer (CDC/NCEH/EM), led the incident response team coordination through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Puerto Rico Department of Health. This team was deployed for hurricanes Irma and María, and was responsible for general public health, health communications, epidemiological assessments and restoration of services, including healthcare facility assessment following the CASPER model for immediate health concerns. One of the most stirring moments was when Cruz described the deficiencies in the response efforts from other locations and organizations seeking to help the island. This was one of many ways in which the panel identified improvements that need to be made to university-led response efforts.

“We asked for assets and resources,” Cruz said. “They sent us people who don’t speak Spanish.”

Dr. Amy Nitza presented on research regarding mental health post-disasters. Their sample included 24% of the population of teachers, equally distributed throughout the educational regions, to seek understanding of their perceptions of their students’ mental health. One year after Hurricane María, the majority of students were experiencing decreased academic, cognitive and emotional functioning; 75% of children had experienced family separation and 44% had experienced a death in the family. While there weren’t significant differences by region, the length of time that schools were closed (especially for schools closed for over one month) drastically impacted mental health.

 

CRC researcher Dr. Phil Berke of UNC-Chapel Hill, second from left, served on a panel called “Integrating Universities with Existing Disaster Planning and Response Frameworks and Doctrines.” Photo By Brian Busher, University of Albany

CRC researcher Dr. Phil Berke of UNC-Chapel Hill, second from left, served on a panel called “Integrating Universities with Existing Disaster Planning and Response Frameworks and Doctrines.” Photo By Brian Busher, University of Albany

Beyond tools: Strategies for aiding in adaptation and mitigation

By Kejing Zhou (UNC-CH Visiting Student of City and Regional Planning, Hunan University Master of Urban Planning Candidate, 2021)

Advanced tools for climate adaptation and mitigation can strengthen community resilience considerably. Local government officials and other public and private sector leaders face challenges in selecting the most effective resources from the many available and employing the right practices to benefit their communities and regions. At RISE, panelists from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Environmental Resilience Institute (ERI),  Albany Visualization and Informatics Labs (AVAIL) and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) examined how decision support platforms can be designed to improve the distribution of meaningful information and insights.

The presentation by Dr. Joel Scheraga of EPA gave a practical overview of the Climate Change Adaptation Resource Center (ARC-X). Focused on the community level, the ARC-X supports local government officials to deal with climate impacts, no matter their level of expertise or experience. Dr. Scheraga said the goals of the ARC-X should be “helping communities to choose what they are suitable for.” This web-based system is designed for targeted communities to obtain comprehensive information tailored to their issues of concern, such as air quality control, water quality, flood protection, disaster emergency response and adaptation planning. Dr. Scheraga also identified the importance of “collaboration across boundaries,” as the best scales for mitigating climate changes can often be within geographic regions rather than within administrative boundaries.

“The outcome of model or tool should answer the question of how effective it will be on the ground,” he said.

Dr. Andrea Webster, the implementation manager of ERI, introduced the Hoosier Resilience Index, and discussed how to promote understanding of the resilience models for decision-makers and non-technical laypeople. The Hoosier Resilience Index is an online platform designed to help Midwestern local governments prepare for climate change. Creating multiple layers for three indexes –  Extreme heat, Extreme precipitation and Floodplain Land Use – the Hoosier Resilience Index firstly describes current and projected climate change impacts statewide and countywide. Using readiness scores from 1 to 5 provided by the index system, communities can evaluate their sensitivity in different climate scenarios. Thus, the visualized maps and readable reports help local governments to prioritize next step actions to increase readiness. Dr. Webster said that for those cities and towns unable to adapt their own models, the state-level tool can facilitate decision-making processes significantly.

 

From left: CRC students Alex Halloway of UNC-Chapel Hill and Sarah Lipuma of Duke University discuss presentations with Cecilio Ortiz García, Senior RISE Fellow with the National Council for Science and the Environment. Photo By Brian Busher, University of Albany

From left: CRC students Alex Halloway of UNC-Chapel Hill and Sarah Lipuma of Duke University discuss presentations with Cecilio Ortiz García, Senior RISE Fellow with the National Council for Science and the Environment. Photo By Brian Busher, University of Albany.

University role in relief: Reflections on new roles in disaster response

By Alex Halloway (UNC-CH Master of City and Regional Planning Candidate, 2020)

Over the course of the conference I found myself gravitating towards the panels that focus on the role that universities can play in disaster planning and recovery. One of these panels was called “University Role in Relief: Reflections on the Universities New Roles in Disaster Response.” This panel had representatives from Texas A&M University, Arizona State University, University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez, Tufts University and the University at Albany. The panel was moderated by Ethel Marie Ríos Orlandi from the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras campus.

There were two speakers in particular that stuck out to me during this panel. The first was Cory Arcak from the Jordan Institute for International Awareness at Texas A&M. She spoke to the audience about her experience setting up a student service-learning project that assisted with the post- María efforts in the summer of 2018. Arcak began by sharing a video that featured student testimonials about the project, in which many spoke about how being a part of the project better taught them how to assist affected communities while recognizing that the community members themselves are the ones that should “be in the driver’s seat.” As one student said, being a part of the project meant learning to “to be a servant and not just a helper.” Not only this, but many of the students recognized that the community members were not just looking for service but for a chance to tell their stories so that their situations and lives could better be known. Arcak also spoke about some of the practical steps she had to use to leverage support from her university for the project. This later led to a discussion during the Q&A session about how post-disaster planning should not just be focused solely on the built environment, but also on economic development in order to empower the effected members of the community.

The second speaker that stuck out to me was Angélica Valdés Valderrama, a doctoral student in Food Nutrition and Policy at Tufts University (one of two doctoral students on the panel). She spoke on her community activism experience after María with the organization Brigada Solidaria del Oeste. For her, the experience of returning to her homeland to assist with recovery efforts helped her to recognize the privileges she had during that process. It also helped her recognize five areas of post-disaster planning that should be prioritized: Infrastructure, vulnerable groups, mental health, equality and responsible research.

 

Prof. Ismael Pagan-Trinidad, who leads a CRC education project, spoke on a panel called “Tapping the Potential of Universities to Develop the Next Generation of Disaster Professionals, Knowledge Creation, Campus Resilience Building and Community Service,” at the RISE conference. The panel was moderated by CRC Executive Director Tom Richardson and also included Dr. Shaleen Miller, who leads a CRC-supported speakers series at UNC-Chapel Hill. Photo by Brian Busher, University of Albany.

Prof. Ismael Pagan-Trinidad, who leads a CRC education project, spoke on a panel called “Tapping the Potential of Universities to Develop the Next Generation of Disaster Professionals, Knowledge Creation, Campus Resilience Building and Community Service,” at the RISE conference. The panel was moderated by CRC Executive Director Tom Richardson and also included Dr. Shaleen Miller, who leads a CRC-supported speakers series at UNC-Chapel Hill. Photo by Brian Busher, University of Albany.

Engineering and coastal resiliency: A national and international imperative/Infrastructure challenges facing our island communities

By Siri Nallaparaju (UNC-CH Master of City and Regional Planning Candidate, 2020)

While most of the panels were on university’s role and relationship with other disaster practitioners, this talk was about infrastructure challenges that were only realized when the hurricanes struck Puerto Rico in 2017. Ricardo López, Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez and CRC researcher, presented some of the main infrastructure challenges that Puerto Ricans faced during and after María. The panel also included Yanna Liang, Professor and Chair, University at Albany, State University of New York; Jorge González-Cruz, NOAA-CESSRST Professor, City University of New York;  Joel Lugo, Executive Director for Operations – West Region, Puerto Rico Aqueduct & Sewer Authority and Rafael Rodríguez-Solis, Professor of Electrical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez. The panelists discussed the challenges from different perspectives such as water, wastewater, power and communication within the island.

They mentioned there was no power for almost two days and there was a lack of communication from one part of the island to another. They also spoke of the advantages of having better communication systems, in whatever way possible, in other catastrophic events such as Hurricane Sandy in New York City, allowing more people to be helped in a shorter amount of time than in Puerto Rico during María. I learned that there are still a lot of gaps to bridge in terms of infrastructure challenges, and drew a parallel between Puerto Rico and a different island case study that I have been studying for the past two years, in Majuli. Majuli is a small riverine island in the Ganga-Brahmaputra region of India. This small island now gets flooded every four months due to the increase in heat and the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers. Due to the lack of new technology or even the proper condition of old communication systems, the people cannot reach the mainland in any way for at least 24 hours, during which anything may happen.

Professor Rodríguez-Solis mentioned that Puerto Rico did not have a written, updated agency crisis and emergency risk communication plans in place prior to María. Due to the lack of power, this contributed to a slower, more effective response, since it was hard to know what the real needs were in towns and cities around the island. Satellite phones, radio operators and  VHF handheld units were used at that time. Better access to telecommunications should be a part of the reconstruction efforts, he said, as this will help emergency response be more productive and increase resiliency in terms of immediate response. However, it has not been considered a high priority for federal funding. The professors mentioned that federal assistance is never enough just in terms of basic food stamps and said that if that is the case with basic response, they might never get enough funding for better telecommunication projects. The role of academic research and services to mitigate failures and also policy efforts to get funds should be incorporated in future discussions.

 

Havidán Rodríguez, President, University at Albany, State University of New York, speaks during the RISE Conference. Photo by University of Albany.

Havidán Rodríguez, President, University at Albany, State University of New York, speaks during the RISE Conference. Photo by University of Albany.

Collaborating with colleagues in extreme operating environments 

By Sarah Lipuma (Duke Nicholas School Master of Environmental Management, 2021)

The breakout session on collaborating with peers in extreme environments delved into difficult situations, unique solutions and lessons learned. This session was moderated by Leonardo Flores of Appalachian State University, with panelists Catalina de Onís of Willamette University, Elvia Melendez-Ackerman of the University of Puerto Rico, Aleyda Villavicencio of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Megan Voorhees of the University of Minnesota, and our own Dr. Shaleen Miller of the University of North Carolina. All of the professionals had experience assisting areas affected by extreme events, and were able to give advice on cooperating and creating partnerships with local people, organizations and colleagues.

Some important takeaways were that if you, as a person hoping to help out in a crisis, do not have skills and experience in emergency response, it may be best to help from afar. Examples of ways to help from afar include:

  • Helping people file their paperwork that needs to be uploaded online when they do not have internet access
  • Providing translation services over the phone
  • Organizing fundraising and awareness building events
  • Counseling distraught people over the phone
  • Donating money and supplies to local charities, especially in the rural areas, and not just cities.

Volunteers may feel compelled to help out because of a strong sense of empathy, but it is important not to self-deploy to an area that has experienced a major disaster without having supplies, skills and other necessities so as not to be a burden on the already fragmented infrastructure.

Havidán Rodríguez, President of the University at Albany, pointed out this need to train volunteers when he said, “We must create a coalition of the willing, a service corps to train and mobilize students to deploy to disasters.”

The other important points made during this session were to be prepared to maintain partnerships and connections over time, even a decade or more; to center the needs and realities of the community first; and to treat survivors with dignity and respect, not as helpless victims.

The ongoing earthquakes that have been trembling the island since early January moved Dr. Marla Perez Lugo, Senior RISE Fellow at the National Council for Science and the Environment, to reaffirm several points that RISE conference attendees agreed upon for approaching disaster response in Puerto Rico in a LinkedIn post on ethical disaster relief.

Science and Policy: Perspectives and Opportunities

The 2018 AMS Summer Policy Colloquium participants prepare to meet with Congressional staff members.

The 2018 AMS Summer Policy Colloquium participants prepare to meet with Congressional staff members.

By Jessamin Straub

Jessamin Straub is a graduate student in the Marine Sciences Department at UNC-Chapel Hill and part of a CRC education program led by CRC Director Dr. Gavin Smith. Straub co-organized a Climate Change and Resilience Symposium last spring and was chosen as a participant in the American Meteorological Society’s Summer Policy Colloquium this summer. She is a CRC Science  and Engineering Workforce Development Grant recipient for the upcoming school year.

Portions of this post originally appeared on the UNdertheC blog.

Last fall semester I was excited to take CRC Director Dr. Gavin Smith’s Survey of Natural Hazards and Disasters course. During the course, Dr. Smith brought in many great speakers that enriched our discussions in class and exposed us to new knowledge and opportunities. One of those speakers, Dr. Bill Hooke, spoke of the importance of learning from past natural disasters to improve policies and getting scientists involved in the policy process. When I spoke with Dr. Hooke after class, he encouraged me to apply to the American Meteorological Society’s Summer Policy Colloquium (AMS SPC), to expand on my interests in science policy.

This June I attended the AMS SPC, where I had the opportunity to immerse myself in science policy through discussions with working professionals and hands-on exercises. The goal of the program is to arm scientists with expertise in the policy-making process and to help the scientific community engage with decision-makers. I believe it’s important for scientists to have a seat at the table when policy decisions are made to ensure available scientific knowledge is used to inform policy.

During the colloquium, I had the opportunity to learn about policy basics and how decisions are made, talk with federal officials and congressional staff about the legislative process, and understand current science and policy issues. Daily topics included science diplomacy, public-private partnerships, perspectives on executive leadership, understanding science policy in the Arctic and science advocacy. Approximately 600 scientists have gone through this program in the past 18 years. The program provided me with the opportunity to not only engage with and understand the policy process but also to create unique professional connections, an important component of be involved in science policy.

Throughout this experience I learned the role that science plays in society and how important it is for science and scientists to be engaged in the policy process. Did you know fewer than 3 percent of members of Congress have any background in science or engineering? However, recently there has been growing interest by early career scientists to engage in the policy process, such as through the National Science Policy Network (NSPN). During the Climate Change and Resilience Symposium I co-organized last semester, students were eager to get involved in science policy and recommended future symposia incorporate more aspects of science policy. There is a growing understanding that scientific expertise, critical thinking skills and data-driven decision-making are vital skills for effective policy, as shown by the large number of scientists running for office in 2018.

Beyond being a politician, there are lots of ways for scientists to get involved with policy. As I learned through my time in D.C., scientists interested in policy usually take two different, but complementary, roles – the advocate and the analyst. Although scientists can be cautious and hesitant about how to engage with policy, there are many resources available to help. For anyone interested in getting involved with science policy, I highly recommend looking into various Science & Technology Policy Fellowships. During my time at the Colloquium, I learned the importance and value these Science and Technology Policy Fellowship provide for scientists.

What is a Science and Technology Policy Fellowship?

Jessamin Straub

Jessamin Straub

Science and Technology Policy Fellowship programs provide effective and up-to-date scientific knowledge in government while providing unique experiences to scientists interested in careers involving public use of scientific information. Fellows have the exciting opportunity to contribute to the policymaking process and gain experience with federal decision-making and policy development. The fellowships place scientists either in executive branch agencies, in the offices of an individual member of Congress, or on a committee for one year in Washington, D.C.

Fellows have the opportunity to provide substantial input to public policy, while expanding beyond their research and scientific skills. The AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellowships (STPF) is an initiative of more than 30 scientific and engineering societies. Each scientific society selects and supports (financially and professionally) scientists and engineers for a one-year fellowship in Washington, DC. These fellowships are typically a pipeline for scientists to gain understanding and skills in policy to either continue in the public policy field, and or use the skills and knowledge they gained, and return to previous professions with a different perspective.

Some examples include:

Why should graduate students be interested in a Science and Technology Policy Fellowship?

  • Check out this helpful video series with AAAS S&T Policy Fellows
  • Gain hands-on policy experience in a challenging and exciting environment
  • Develop a wealth of professional contacts while becoming a member of an influential network of fellows
  • Hone universally useful skills such as adaptability, effective communication, networking and leadership
  • Learn about the scientific funding process (important for securing those highly sought-after competitive grants!)
  • Expand on analytical skills in a different setting
  • Learn about career opportunities outside of academia

Tips/Resources:

 

Funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the primary objective of the Science and Engineering Workforce Development Grant is to ensure that U.S. citizens are trained in homeland security-related science and engineering disciplines in order to maintain U.S. leadership in science and technology, as required by the Homeland Security Act of 2002. The grant program provides tuition assistance, stipends, and funding for travel to professional conferences and internships. Grant recipients are expected to actively participate in research projects under the mentorship of a faculty member in the student’s field of study.

CRC certificate students host resilience symposium

Naeema Muhammad, organizing co-director of North Carolina Environmental Justice Network (third from right) speaks on the “Rural Disaster Recovery and Hurricane Matthew” panel at the Climate Change and Resilience Symposium on April 20, 2018. The panel also included (from left) Dr. Larry Engel, professor in the UNC Department of Epidemiology; Chuck Flink, professor in Landscape Architecture at NC State University; and Linda Joyner, Mayor Pro Tem of Princeville, N.C.

Naeema Muhammad, organizing co-director of North Carolina Environmental Justice Network (third from right) speaks on the “Rural Disaster Recovery and Hurricane Matthew” panel at the Climate Change and Resilience Symposium on April 20, 2018. The panel also included (from left) Dr. Larry Engel, professor in the UNC Department of Epidemiology; Chuck Flink, professor in Landscape Architecture at NC State University; and Linda Joyner, Mayor Pro Tem of Princeville, N.C.

Graduate students at UNC-Chapel Hill who are part of a Natural Hazards Resilience Certificate course taught as part of a Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence (CRC) education project hosted a Climate Change and Resilience Symposium on April 20, 2018. The event included a keynote speaker; two plenary panels focusing on resilience issues; and a student poster contest highlighting local climate-related research.

The student group leading the event, Carolina Hazards and Resilience Planners (CHRP), was formed by students of CRC Director Dr. Gavin Smith who are part of the CRC education project. The event was co-organized by students Christian Kamrath, Margaret Keener and Jessie Straub.

The Symposium was the fusion of the 5th annual Climate Change Symposium (hosted by Carolina Climate Change Scientists) and the 2nd annual Resilience Symposium (hosted by Carolina Hazards & Resilience Planners (CHRP,) also supported by the CRC).

“The event served as a venue for students to present their research, facilitate discussions around climate change and resilience, and connect those across the university involved in Climate Change and Resilience work,” Straub said. “We are excited about the success of this year’s event and look forward to enhancing the event next year and fostering a Climate Change and Resilience Triangle community with collaboration from UNC, Duke and N.C. State.”

The keynote speaker was Dr. Susan White, Executive Director of North Carolina Sea Grant, North Carolina Space Grant and UNC Water Resources Research Institute, who spoke about building resiliency through bridging science and society. Two panels of experts discussed “Climate Change Communication” and “Rural Disaster Recovery and Hurricane Matthew.” The latter panel focused on communities impacted by Hurricane Matthew in 2016 that are the focus of the Hurricane Matthew Recovery & Resilience Initiative.

Susan White of the North Carolina Sea Grant was the keynote speaker at the Climate Change and Resilience Symposium.

Susan White of the North Carolina Sea Grant was the keynote speaker at the Climate Change and Resilience Symposium.

Sitting on the “Climate Change Communication” panel were Dr. John Bruno, professor of biology at UNC-Chapel Hill; Dr. Linda Rimer, Liaison for State & Community Resilience for the US EPA (and CRC advisory board member); Dr. David Salvesen, director of the Sustainable Triangle Field Site with the UNC Institute for the Environment; and Dr. Ashley Ward, Climate Integration and Outreach Associate for Carolinas Integrated Sciences and Assessments and UNC Department of Geography.

Participants discussed how to best communicate climate sciences to different audiences through different methods, how to translate results to the public, and the role of scientists and professionals in climate communications.

On the “Rural Disaster Recovery and Hurricane Matthew” panel were Dr. Larry Engel, professor in the UNC Department of Epidemiology; Chuck Flink, professor in Landscape Architecture at NC State University; Linda Joyner, Mayor Pro Tem of Princeville, N.C.; and Naeema Muhammad, organizing co-director of North Carolina Environmental Justice Network.

Participants discussed the challenges faced by small towns and rural areas in recovering from Matthew, the exacerbation of rural areas’ challenges such as population loss from the hurricane, and differing experiences across the state with disaster recovery.

The Symposium was also a chance for undergraduate and graduate students, postdocs and faculty doing research on hazards, resilience and climate change to display and discuss their research through a student poster session. Winners were selected by a panel of judges, with Environmental Sciences & Engineering graduate student Omar Nawaz taking first place for his work on health benefits of decreases in PM2.5 and the ozone in the United States from 1990-2016. Marine Sciences graduate student Molly Bost took second place for her poster on the timescale of storm bed preservation in estuarine middle bay environments from Hurricane Matthew New River, N.C., and Bailey Thomasson won the award for best undergraduate poster for her poster on examining the interactive effects of ocean warming and acidification on the skeletal morphology of two Caribbean reef-building corals.

About the certificate program

The Natural Hazards Resilience Certificate Program, offered by the Coastal Resilience Center (CRC) in partnership with the Department of City and Regional Planning at UNC (DCRP), is a graduate certificate program focused on the study of natural hazards resilience.

The classes include “Planning for Natural Hazards and Climate Change Adaptation” (fall), “Survey of Natural Hazards and Disasters” (spring) and a “Natural Hazards Resilience Speaker Series” (spring).

The Links: March 2018

CRC, RENCI and federal partners recently released a report, “Rethinking Floods Analytics,” from last fall’s Flood Analytics Colloquium. Read the report on the CRC website.

 

Website news/blog posts/publications:

CRC Researchers in the News:

Good reading:

The Links: February 2018

CRC staff, researchers, advisory board, federal reviewers and guests gathered for the 3rd PI meeting from Feb. 28-March 1, 2018.

CRC staff, researchers, advisory board, federal reviewers and guests gathered for the 3rd PI meeting from Feb. 28-March 1, 2018.

The Links is a monthly roundup of articles from the Center, good reading and job links that have been posted on our website and social media in the last month.

Website news/blog posts/publications:

CRC Researchers in the News:

Good reading:

Responding to community needs: Hurricane Matthew recovery and resilience in eastern North Carolina

By Jessica Southwell

This post originally appeared on the UNC Institute for the Environment blog.

Jessica Southwell is Project Manager for the Hurricane Matthew Disaster Recovery and Resilience Initiative, and coordinates work in six communities in eastern North Carolina impacted by Hurricane Matthew.

The Hurricane Matthew Recovery and Resilience Initiative is led by the Center for Natural Hazards Resilience at UNC-Chapel Hill, which also leads the Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence. The Initiative was started in early 2017 to address recovery concerns in six North Carolina communities.

A few months ago, local partners in Hurricane Matthew recovery sat at a six-top table at a diner in Kinston, N.C. We had spent the morning walking through the logistics for hosting an AmeriCorps team that would soon be in town, meeting just a few weeks following the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Matthew.

Our discussion soon turned to what it was like those first few days after the storm. Many discussed watching the river rise from their various posts in town, even in the days following Matthew when the sky had turned blue after dumping inches upon inches of rain on already drenched soil.

Everyone around the table had been through this before. When Hurricane Floyd hit North Carolina in 1999, residents believed the 500-year flood would be the only one they witnessed in a lifetime. Just 17 years later, in October 2016, the same residents were experiencing it again. Now, more than a year after Matthew, the topic of hurricane recovery in Kinston, and in communities across Eastern North Carolina, is still a regular, if not daily, part of the local conversation. Continue reading

The Links: January 2018

An ADCIRC mesh of the North Carolina and Virginia region is shown.

An ADCIRC mesh of the North Carolina and Virginia region is shown.

The Links is a monthly roundup of articles from the Center, good reading and job links that have been posted on our website and social media in the last month.

Website news/blog posts/publications:

2018 Natural Hazards Resilience Speakers Series

Event: ‘Rising’ exhibition opening

CRC Researchers in the News:

Good reading:

The Links: December 2017

CRC PI Dr. Ginis and his collaborators combine data from hurricanes that have had severe impacts on Rhode Island in the past with hypothetical worst-case scenarios to simulate Hurricane Rhody. See more in our story from December.

The Links is a monthly roundup of articles from the Center, good reading and job links that have been posted on our website and social media in the last month.

Website news/blog posts/publications:

CRC in the News:

Good reading:

The Links: November 2017

Image from the Princeville Community Design Workshop, held in August. More information from the event, including photos, is in the links below.

Image from the Princeville Community Design Workshop, held in August. More information from the event, including photos, is in the links below.

The Links is a monthly roundup of articles from the Center, good reading and job links that have been posted on our website and social media in the last month.

To read about Center experts discussing hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, visit our Hurricane Season 2017 Information page. To read additional Hurricane Matthew recovery news, visit our Hurricane Matthew page.

Website news/blog posts/publications:

CRC in the News:

Good reading:

The Links: October 2017

CRC PI Dr. Ismael Pagan-Trinidad took photos from the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. More photos are at http://ow.ly/wdRr30gjzq6.

CRC PI Dr. Ismael Pagan-Trinidad took photos from the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. More photos are at http://ow.ly/wdRr30gjzq6.

The Links is a monthly roundup of articles from the Center, good reading and job links that have been posted on our website and social media in the last month.

To read about Center experts discussing hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, visit our Hurricane Season 2017 Information page. To read additional Hurricane Matthew recovery news, visit our Hurricane Matthew page.

Website news/blog posts/publications:

CRC in the News:

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